E.M. Forster

Edward Morgan Forster (1879-1970) wrote six novels – Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), Howards End (1910), A Passage to India (1924). Maurice , written in 1914, was published posthumously in 1971. He also published two volumes of short stories; two collections of essays; a critical work (Aspects of the Novel); The Hill of Devi; two biographies; two books about Alexandria; and the libretto for Britten’s opera Billy Budd. David Leavitt is the author of several novels and story collections, most recently The Body of Jonah Boyd (2004). With Mark Mitchell, he edited the Penguin US edition of E.M. Forster’s Selected Stories, as well as The New Penguin Book of Gay Short Stories. He lives in Gainesville, Florida, where he is Professor of English at the University of Florida.

See Gay for Today

“Maurice” on Penguin Classics

Maurice Hall is a young man who grows up confident in his privileged status and well aware of his role in society. Modest and generally conformist, he nevertheless finds himself increasingly attracted to his own sex. Through Clive, whom he encounters at Cambridge, and through Alec, the gamekeeper on Clive’s country estate,Maurice gradually experiences a profound emotional and sexual awakening. A tale of passion, bravery and defiance, this intensely personal novel was completed in 1914 but remained unpublished until after Forster’s death in 1970. Compellingly honest and beautifully written, it offers a powerful condemnation of the repressive attitudes of British society, and is at once a moving love story and an intimate tale of one man’s erotic and political self-discovery.

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